Uffizi Gallery Department of Prints and Drawings

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Uffizi Gallery Department of Prints and Drawings

If you are an art lover planning to visit the famous museum, not stopping by the Uffizi Gallery Department of Prints and Drawings is a colossal mistake.

Rough drawings, prints, and sketches by world-famous artists from centuries ago are displayed here.

Not only for the art but hidden historical facts within these pieces, increase their value and make the trip worth it.

With so many artworks to go through, we have saved you some time and listed the best and most popular ones in the Uffizi Gallery Department of Prints and Drawings.

Here’s a detailed list of the artworks you should check out when visiting the Uffizi Prints section.

Jan Lutman, Goldsmith

Jan Lutman, Goldsmith
Image: Metmuseum.org

This is a masterpiece from Rembrandt, where he expresses his idea of existence, both realistic and metaphysical.

He portrays a world where even the most concrete appearances conceal a supernatural reality.

The drawing is about light and shadows and features his friend Jan. 

Jan is making something special with tools like hammers, metal pouches, and two inventions – candlesticks with a bowl. 

Rembrandt filled the space between a big chair and the wall with a thin white strip to make it look special. 

He also used “hatching” to make the robe look different.

Self Portrait in the Style of Medusa

Self Portrait in the Style of Medusa
Image: Uffizi.it

This particular picture was originally called “Mask in Pen.” 

It was the first of 22 pictures by an artist named Andrea Mantegna. 

Even though it was shown a lot and not cared for very well, it still looks amazing. 

The face and expression were detailed and made with just a few strokes. 

It’s like a mask makes a face look special, as if it had magical powers. 

Even though it’s not in the best condition, it’s still iconic and considered one of the best for its time and this century.

Christ healing the sick

Christ healing the sick
Image: Uffizi.it

Yet another iconic piece from Rembrandt in the Uffizi Gallery Department of Prints and Drawings tells the story of Jesus from the Matthew Psalm. 

He put together different parts of the story into one picture and made it so everyone could think about it in their own way.

He used new techniques like acid engraving, drypoint, and Burlin to make the artwork special and last longer. 

There’s also a funny story about this large engraving. 

Rembrandt wanted to buy some prints from another artist and used this work as part of the payment!

To help you plan your visit to the Uffizi, you can check out the “Opening hours” and the “Best time to visit” sections; for details on the significant artworks, halls, and floor plan, check out the “Uffizi Gallery artworks” section. If you want to skip the lines at the ticket counter, we recommend booking museum tickets ahead of time or planning a guided tour to make the most of your visit.

The Liberation of Ruggiero from the Island of Alcina series

The Liberation of Ruggiero from the Island of Alcina series
Image: Uffizi.it

The masterpiece “Liberation of Ruggiero from the Island of Alcina” is a famous opera by Francesca Caccini, a successful composer, and performer from the Medici court.

This work was so popular that it was made into a print in 1625, the same year the opera was released. 

Five illustrations are part of the print, which show the four scenes of the ballet and the final battle between the knights. 

Alfonso Parigi, the son of Giulio Parigi, the official architect of the Medici Court, engraved these plates. 

Here’s a more elaborate detail on all the iconic scenes that are part of the Uffizi Gallery Department of Prints and Drawings:

During the first scene 

During the first scene
Image: Uffizi.it

According to the legend, Neptune rides a magical sea horse that pulls a unique chariot. 

Neptune sings a song about the adventures of a brave hero called Paladin. The song was sung for a special prince who had a river named after him.

The second change in the scene

The second change in the scene
Image: Uffizi.it

In this Uffizi print, Melissa rides on a dolphin’s back to get to an island.

Melissa was trying to help Ruggerio, who was under a bad spell, so he could marry the person he was supposed to. 

This would help start the House of Este. 

The person who made this picture was Alfonso Parigi, but it was actually his dad, Giulio, who originally made it. 

He was an architect and worked at the Medici Court.

The third change in the scene

The third change in the scene
Image: Uffizi.it

In one scene, the witch Alicina reveals her monstrous appearance and finally flees from the island, shivering in flames.

It happened when Melissa used her magic to break the evil spell that kept Ruggerio and Bradamante apart. 

The painting was inspired by a story called Orlando Furioso and cleverly aims to show the defeat of love without marriage.

Fourth change of scene 

Fourth change of scene
Image: Uffizi.it

This scene depicts the end of a show put on by people who were not professional actors. 

The backdrop appears to be a painting of knights on a stage. 

It was created by Alfonso Parigi, who was relatively young yet did an excellent job. 

It can be seen in the Uffizi print, which is stunning!

Imperiale, villa of the Most Serene Archduchess of Tuscany

Imperiale, villa of the Most Serene Archduchess of Tuscany
Image: Uffizi.it

At the Villa di Poggio Imperiale, people got to watch a show with knights on horses! 

The show was called “The Liberation of Ruggiero from the Island of Alcina.” 

It ended with a special kind of dancing with horses. 

The main character, Ferdinando Saracinelli, was ultimately saved thanks to the villa, which belonged to the Grand Duchess of Tuscany, Maria Maddalena of Austria. 

Guilio was the one who restored the villa and also created the show.

Uffizi Gallery Book and Archives

Uffizi Gallery Book and Archives
Image: Uffizi.it

The Uffizi Gallery Book and Archives is like a library created long ago by the Grand Duke. 

It has two sections that people can visit. 

The first is a book by a famous artist named Giorgio Vasari that tells stories about many artists. 

The second section has art from another artist named Filippo Baduccini and is the base for the Uffizi Gallery’s art department

The library art is incredible and helps us learn about what art was like before.

So, if you decide to tour the Uffizi Gallery Books and Archives, be prepared to indulge yourself in this exciting Italian history library.

Featured Image: Nytimes.com

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